Discussions

This is where you can start discussions around security visualization topics.

NOTE: If you want to submit an image, post it in the graph exchange library!

You might also want to consider posting your question or comment on the SecViz Mailinglist!

Discussion Entries

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /usr/www/users/zrlram/secviz/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.module on line 1387.

3D Modeling of Real Time Security Events

This is some software called Gibson that I wrote in python using the Panda3D game engine. It currently takes input from intrusion detection systems and displays their interactions with nodes in your network as it receives them. In addition to 3 axes, it uses direction, color, time, etc. to visually organize the data. I'm working on improving the interface and expanding the types of data it will map. Very much in alpha phase of development, but I'd love feedback! Watch the video, it shows it better than a static picture.

Gibson

need help in 3d treemap

Hi all,

i'm a student and i'm doing project on visualization. can i know is it possible to do a 3d treemap using this DAVIX? hope to heard from you soon. thank you.

Regards,
Adeline

VizSec 2011 Call for Papers Released

This year's VizSec Symposium will be held at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA on 20 July 2011. VizSec brings researchers and practioners from academia, government, and industry to share insights and present solutions to modern cyber security challenges using visualization techniques. Technical papers, speakers, and presentations will be featured in this year's program. If you are conducting research into security visualization please consider submitting a research paper (due by 1 April 2011) or a panel proposal (due by 15 April 2011).

Security Visualization - State of 2010 and 2011 Predictions

At the recent SANS Incident response and log management summit, I was part of a panel on security visualization. As an introduction, I presented the attached slides on the security visualization trends and where we are today.
I looked at four areas for security visualization: Data, Cloud, Tools, and Security. I started with looking at the log maturity scale that I developed a while ago. Barely any of the present companies could place themselves to the right of correlation point. It's sad, but probably everyone expected it. We have a long way to go with log analysis!

Data

It's very simple. If you don't have the data, you cannot visualize it. A lot of companies are still struggling to collect the necessary data. In some cases, the data is not even available because applications do not generate it. This is where data analysis or security people have to start voicing their needs to the application owners and developers in order to generate the data that they need. In addition, developers and security people have to communicate more to learn from each other. Ideally, it is not even the security folks that visualize and analyze the application logs, but it is the application people. Just a thought!
What we will see next year is that the Big Data movement is going to enable us to crunch more and bigger data sets. Hopefully 2011 will also give us an interoperability standard that is going to ease log analysis.

Cloud

What does the cloud have to do with security visualization? Well, it has to do with processing power and with application development. Applications generate logs and logs are used for security visualization. Cloud services are new pieces of software that are being developed. We have a chance here to build visibility into those applications, meaning we have an opportunity to educate these developers to apply logging in the right way.
Next year we will see a lot of companies that are going to roll their own log analysis systems based on big data technology, such as Hadoop. We have seen a number of companies doing this already in 2010: Facebook, Linkedin, NetFlix, Zynga, etc. Traditional log management solutions just don't scale to these companies' needs. This will continue next year.

Tools

With tools I mean security visualization tools. We are absolutely nowhere with this. There are a couple of simple tools out there, but there is no tool that really does what we need: brushing, linked views, supports large data sets, easy to use, contextualized, etc.
Next year won't really change anything in this area. What we will see is that more and more tools are built on the Web. The cloud movement is kind of responsible for this push, but so is the broad utilization of HTML5 with all of it's goodness (e.g., Websockets, Canvas). We will see advances in the social space with regards to visualization tools. Security will continue utilizing those tools to analyze security data. It's not ideal because these tools are not meant for this, but hey, better than nothing! Maybe this will help creating awareness and will surface some interesting use-cases for security visualization.

Security

What will we see in security visualization? Well, as we saw earlier, we don't have the data. What that means is that we haven't really had a chance to learn how to visualize that data. And because we didn't have that chance, we don't really understand our data. Read that again. I think this is an important point!
Next year will give us more bad security visualization examples. And I am lumping product displays into this. Have you looked at your tool lately? During the SANS summit, I had a chance to look at some of the vendor's dashboards. They are horrible. 3D charts, no legends, bad choice of colors, non actionable dashboards, etc. Note to log management vendors: I offer a security visualization class. You might want to consider taking it! But back on topic. Visualization, just like security, will stay an afterthought. It's being added when everything else is in place already. We know how that generally turns out.

I know, I am painting a gloomy picture. Hopefully 2011 will have some surprises for us!

Equilibrium Networks free/open-source software release

Equilibrium Networks' free/open-source visual network traffic monitoring software is now available for download at http://www.eqnets.com. A video of our enterprise system in action and technical documents detailing our approaches to traffic analysis, real-time interactive visualization and alerting are also available at our website.

Besides a zero-cost download option, we are also offering Linux-oriented installation media and an enterprise version of our system with premium features such as configurable automatic alerting, nonlinear replay, and a 3D traffic display.

Discounts—including installation media for a nominal shipping and handling fee—are available to institutional researchers or in exchange for extensions to our platform.

The software can run in its entirely on a dedicated x86 workstation with four or more cores and a network tap, though our system supports distributed hardware configurations. An average graphics card is sufficient to operate the visualization engine.

Log Visualization in the Cloud - Webinar

On August 19th, at 10am PST I will be giving a Webinar on the topic of visualization. You can register and watch the Webinar right here:

A BrightTALK Channel

Cloud-based Log Analysis and Visualization

I was giving a talk at RMLL 2010, a french free software conference. The title, Cloud-based Log Analysis and Visualization, already gives the content away. But in case, here is the abstract for the talk:




Cloud computing has changed the way businesses operate, the way businesses make money, and the way business have to protect their assets and information. More and more software applications are moving into the cloud. People are running their proxies in the cloud and soon you will be collecting your logs in the cloud. You shouldn't have to deal with log collection and log management. You should be able to focus your time on getting value out of the logs; to do log analysis and visualization.

In this presentation we will explore how we can leverage the cloud to build security visualization tools. We will discuss some common visualization libraries and have a look at how they can be deployed to solve security problems. We will see how easy it is to quickly stand up such an application. To close the presentation, we will look at a number of security visualization examples that show how security data benefits from visual representations. For example, how can network traffic, firewall data, or IDS data be visualized effectively?

Monitoring / Visualisation Stations, & relevance of layer 4 traffic

Opinions sought from those working in the relevant areas - handed this document in as part of a degree project in security visualisation & monitoring, and the feedback was that the network and monitoring station/s are not realistic, and that I should have focused on port 80 and layer 7 traffic only, as layer 4 is not relevant any longer. The link provided below is only part of the document, I presume it's the part they had issues with. I wasn't actually intending to focus on web traffic, which was made clear in the document anyway (tho I did indicate to them that with the likes of Rumints packet contents visualiser, it is certainly viable to utilise that to match up with malware signature databases - but that aspect wasn't the focus of the project).
I don't expect it says anything that people working in those areas will be unaware of, and the general intention was to address what would be required for a monitoring station / network, which includes visualisation software, that would work in real-time as well as offline analysis and traffic capture.
The grouping into 'objectives' is just part of how the work has to be presented to comply with guidelines. Cheers for input, I know you're probably busy.

http://docs.google.com/fileview?id=0B2FJ1rXW3lv4Y2UyMGFlZmYtMWE3OC00MmNlLTk4ZDktMmEyNjdhODYxM2Iy&hl=en

nb - the last part is probably wrong about ad-hoc IPs; I can't remember exactly right now how they are handed out; they probably aren't always dynamic esp. now it's more common to get fixed-IP SIMs.

EDV - Event Data Visualization

Afterglow has been on my list of 'neat tools' for quite some time. Thankfully, last month I finally had a bit of spare time to really play with it.

The result was EDV: http://www.pintumbler.org/code/edv

See the page for more info. Keep in mind, this is BETA!

It currently supports Snort (Sguil DB format). However, even the untrained eye can easily modify it for straight Snort
or anything else you can MySQL query. Once you have your sources defined it will take care of the rest.

The tool is static (controlled by configs and cron) for now but I do plan on adding a query tab to the web page so that you can do on the fly queries. Low priority for now. I have been focusing on 2 parsers that log directly to MySQL. One parses Syslog output from a Barracuda spam firewall and the other URL info captured by URLSnarf. These will be my next additions.

Comments and suggestions welcome.

Thanks.

Interesting patterns World of Warcraft

It's been a pretty quiet day today, but I noticed an intersting pattern emerge. I hadn't seen it before, which is really strange considering I work at a college. Im using Sphere of Influence 3.0 summary window and timeline from a Cisco ASA.
In patten "C" I show the normal allowed network traffic. (the horizontal "bars" of traffic are a p2p program not associated with WoW) This shows traffic both into and out of the college. I noticed the patten and highlighted it some more. This showed me the organization. Now if anyone knows anything about world of warcraft the organization was blizzard communications. I filtered all traffic to and from organizations with the word blizzard in them. As you can see from pattern "A" it shows clearly a world of warcraft traffic patten - updating itself is the easier pattern to spot. I also filtered the traffic in pattern "B" denied window. The traffic being denied is port 3724...voice. The timeline (Pattern c) assured me that traffic was indeed seen on 3724 (WoW port) Although tempted to put in a QOS statement to slowly grind that machine to a crawl, I opted for the easier solution. It came from a library computer. So it was just a simple matter of visiting the library and removing the software off a machine that somehow was unfrozen. Freezen the machine and updating a few rule sets.

Patterns always interest me, just thought I'd share this one with you all.